[excuses or explanations?]

[excuses or explanations?]

Last week, since half of the people didn’t show up for our little group, we ended up changing the theme from Christian denominations to what one of the guys called “The Case against Middle Ground.” He defined it as the “golden middle” at first, but we ended up calling it “middle ground” because golden middle required another set of “extremes.”

The middle ground in this case was between God and the world. (Being there, in my opinion, is no golden middle… you end up right above the deep pit… NOT the best place to be.)

While we were discussing what can be considered choosing “middle ground,” Fedya kept mentioning that we all have our own excuses we come up with when there are some arguable points. He attempted to use Harry Potter as one of those questionable things, but had to switch to drinking alcoholic drinks because I was on Potter’s side.

Excuses, excuses, excuses.

We all like ’em, don’t we? Even when we say we don’t like them, we invent them subconsciously. Sometimes, we get so good at this, we believe our excuses ourselves.

However… are all excuses just that? Or maybe some of them are real explanations?

For example, I love Harry Potter – I don’t feel bad about declaring this. When people ask “Why?” I tell them that Harry Potter books help me understand the Bible. Usually people’s reaction is not the one that I would’ve liked to see.

“What?! God? In Harry Potter? How can you compare Bible and Harry Potter junk?”

*Deep breath* “Yeah, I even own a book that I bought at the General Assembly of the Church of the Nazarene that is titled Looking for God in Harry Potter.”

*Look of honest shock on most faces* “How can you look for God in Harry Potter? It’s full of magic and whatnot!”

“What about C.S. Lewis’ Narnia?”

That’s where most of the people quiet down because they cannot explain why Aslan’s magic is okay but all the other magic is wrong.

Yet I wish I could help them see… I know I have written a lot about this topic, yet it still keeps creeping up – people seem to like throwing that in my face… without fully understanding what the Potter books are really about. I wish I could tell them how I can see the Gospel story in those books. I wish I could show them how the examples from those books can be used to spread His Word… Yet people shut their minds right after I say “Harry Potter.”

Anyway… That’s not the point of my post.

My point is that what for me is an explanation – the reasons why I can read Harry Potter books and not feel as if I would burn in hell for that – for others, it’s an excuse.

“Oh yeah, you bought a book at the General Assembly – so what, is that your excuse?”

“No. But what will you say about Aslan’s magic?”

“He didn’t do real magic.”

“Really? Or is that an excuse?”

Heh, amazing.

But the point is… can some of our excuses be explanations and some explanations – excuses?

  • Can I take the easy way out and say, “Yes!” Or is that just an excuse for not engaging in conversation? 🙂 I have to admit lil sis. I have never read HP. I really don’t know why since I used to read Lewis and Lawhead and watched LOTR (not read them though) and still do like an occasional fantasy novel. Maybe it was the preconceived idea I had from someone else. Again, is that an excuse? you make a good case here and maybe i will take up that first HP novel and give it a try. But please don’t try to get me to read any Twilight novel. Love ya.

    • Heh, I can understand the point of view of “I don’t know since I haven’t read it.” That makes sense. However, it bugs me the most when people say “I tried watching the first movie and I didn’t like it.”

      I am not advocating for everyone to read Potter. I am simply using it as a tool when I know that whoever I am talking to has read / watched it and knows the story. Dunno – you might want to give it a try sometime – but beware – you’ll want to read the entire story 😀

      I won’t try to get you to read any Twilight because I haven’t read / watched neither of the series. And frankly, I don’t even want to. I did want to read it some time ago, but only because all the girls at the youth group seemed infatuated (or “in love”) with the characters. Thankfully, they have moved on (or at least they are no longer “in love” with werevolves and vampires) and so my reason for reading those novels has disappeared.

%d bloggers like this: